(Source: Foresity, via definitive)

massmarriage:

エレベーターガール

massmarriage:

エレベーターガール

(via mudwerks)

crossconnectmag:

Anelia Loubser is a photographer and fine artist from Cape Town, South Africa.

“Alienation” is a collection of portraits that challenges the viewer by using creative tactics based on the concept, “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change” - Wayne Dyer.

Be introduced to the alienated being inside us all, disconcerting beauty emerges. The work is on the one hand strangely aesthetic, on the other hand mysteriously eerie.
 

                                         :-)

Cross Connect Mag // Facebook - Flickr - Twitter

(Source: cross-connect.cc, via 2headedsnake)

(Source: hkangela, via h-emoglobin)

maudelynn:

Skeleton Riders, Halloween c.1920 
via http://varuben.thoughts.com

maudelynn:

Skeleton Riders, Halloween c.1920 

via http://varuben.thoughts.com

(Source: maudelynn.tumblr.com , via androphilia)

foreverpruned:

"I always check the bibles for these things …"

Read ha!
Slay Ha!
Drag Ha! And take her edges as souvenirs!

(Source: lolalatores, via ethernius)

decadentlullaby:

When women used to be depressed or were not “taking care of their men” properly their husbands could send them to the psych ward for attitude adjustments. This was part of conditioning them to always wear a smile. They believed that if a woman saw herself smiling that it would become natural practice and that she would be “cured”. This often went along with shock therapies. 
I found this post on Facebook with comments made by people with loved ones who wore these for the reasons mentioned above. After finding this story, I did a Google search and found out about a school in Budapest that used these masks for treatment of depression after World War 2. So yes, these stories are true.

decadentlullaby:

When women used to be depressed or were not “taking care of their men” properly their husbands could send them to the psych ward for attitude adjustments. This was part of conditioning them to always wear a smile. They believed that if a woman saw herself smiling that it would become natural practice and that she would be “cured”. This often went along with shock therapies.

I found this post on Facebook with comments made by people with loved ones who wore these for the reasons mentioned above. After finding this story, I did a Google search and found out about a school in Budapest that used these masks for treatment of depression after World War 2. So yes, these stories are true.

(via androphilia)

Gillian Anderson and Ben Foster in A Streetcar Named Desire.

(Source: andersondaily, via morticia-addams)

David Bowie

.. can you be anymore posh

(Source: mirrormaskcamera)

pomegranateandivy:

I am going to print this out, laminate it, and keep it with my gloves and spade.

(Source: theoreticalpermaculture, via ibrokemyheart)

(Source: awwww-cute, via christotwat)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

James Ostrer

Photographer James Ostrer documents our obsession with sugar in a series of grotesque real life portraits of people covered in layers of sweets and junk food. Speaking largely on the to the global food production and increasingly dangerous methods of mass production, Ostrer’s photographs conjure tribal images that are both fascinating and repulsive. Via the press release, “This adornment becomes a mask of what we eat which then becomes entwined with a hyper-pop sensibility and an obsequious inquiry into the great volumes of sugar that flow through our bodies.”

(via funkylittlegreenghoul)


Uma Thurman and John Travolta filming Pulp Fiction (1994)

Uma Thurman and John Travolta filming Pulp Fiction (1994)

(Source: aladyloves, via dirtyprettything)

jedavu:

Amazing Face-Paintings Transform Models Into The 2D Works Of Famous Artists

by  Valeriya Kutsan

(via imchillnjustchilln)